White vs Yellow Popcorn

When you visit the movie theater, some would say the most important decision is choosing which movie to watch. But, we would argue that it’s your choice of popcorn that is equally, if not more important. Imagine watching a full movie with the wrong type of popcorn!

Horror! That is why you should learn about the differences between certain popcorn so that you know what to expect every time you order it.

Popcorn is a great snack. It’s inexpensive (when you’re not in the movie theater), it’s easy to make, it’s long-lasting, and some forms of popcorn can even be healthy. That’s right!

Popcorn can be an extremely healthy whole grain food. The issue is that we like to add tons of butter, salt, and other ingredients such as cheese to make it as tasty as possible. Unfortunately, this makes popcorn very unhealthy.

If you’re looking to try a healthier form of popcorn and want to make it at home on the stove, you will need to decide on white or yellow kernels at first.

Head to your local grocery store and you will probably see someone lingering in the popcorn section trying to decide which color to get. After reading today’s blog, you will not be that person!

Read on as we discuss the differences between white and yellow popcorn. We will be finding out if they taste the same and which one, if either, is healthier to snack on.

White vs Yellow Popcorn: The Differences

Aside from their colors, there are some noticeable differences between white and yellow popcorn.

The main differences are:

  • White popcorn has smaller kernels, thinner hulls, is more tender, has a milder flavor, and turns into a snow-white color once popped
  • Yellow popcorn has smaller kernels, thick hulls, a stranger flavor, is fluffy, and turn into an off-white color once popped

Many brands of popcorn offer both yellow and white kernels such as Bob’s Red Mill and Orville Redenbacher. However, some stores may only stock yellow kernels. If so, you would probably need to visit a different store to find both varieties in stock.

If you prefer more tender kernels, white popcorn is the better option. But, if you like fluffier popcorn in general, then yellow kernels are the safest bet.

Difference In Taste

Yellow popcorn tends to have more flavor than its white counterpart. It boasts a stronger corn flavor which, to be honest, is what most of us want from our popcorn.

One of the most popular brands of popcorn is Monarch Butterfly. And, for good reason too. The flavor of this yellow popcorn is incredible and it even tastes good without any additional salt.

White popcorn tends to have a sweeter taste but doesn’t retain as much corn flavor. So, if you’re basing popcorn taste on corn alone, yellow popcorn is the better choice.

The Color Of Popped Kernel

The primary difference between white and yellow popcorn is, of course, their colors. However, once the popcorn is popped, their insides are white no matter their exterior appearance.

When you pop white popcorn, the insides look pure white, like snow. In contrast, popped yellow popcorn has more of a duller, off-white hue. In other words, white popcorn is much brighter inside than the yellow variety.

Furthermore, yellow popcorn typically pops larger than white corn. This is because the kernels of yellow popcorn are generally larger in size than white popcorn.

So, if you want to enjoy larger pieces of kernel once they have been popped, yellow popcorn is the way to go.

Hulls

Another key difference between white and yellow popcorn is the hulls of the kernels. The hulls are what bothers most people as they crunch down on their popcorn. This is because they can easily become stuck in the teeth.

The larger the hull, the more likely it will get lodged in between your teeth and feel uncomfortable. This is why white popcorn is better as the hull is generally smaller and will not cause as much of an issue.

Nutritional Value Of White And Yellow Popcorn

There are, in fact, a few white varieties of popcorn that have been labeled and advertised as “hulless.” Do not be fooled by this, though. Popcorn that is labeled as having no hull does not mean the kernels have zero hulls.

It just means that the hulls explode when the popcorn is popped. This explosion is enough for the hulls not to be detected as you eat the popcorn.

Nutritional Value Of White And Yellow Popcorn

When you take out the devilish butter and salt that we love so much, both white and yellow popcorn have hardly any difference in nutritional value.

If you take a serving of 4 cups of air-popped white popcorn, it will typically contain 25 grams of carbohydrates and 5 grams of fiber. Take the same serving of yellow popcorn and it contains 22 grams of carbohydrates and 4 grams of fiber. Yes, a difference but it’s truly minuscule.

White and yellow popcorn are both good sources of fiber as they make up more than 15 percent of your daily value. Both colors also contain an equal amount of protein and fat content.

If you have a 4-cup serving of either white or yellow popcorn, it will contain 1 gram of fat and 4 grams of protein. Therefore, they can be considered a great low-fat snack.

Of course, when you start adding butter, salt, and cheese into the mix, the fat content rises substantially and neither white nor yellow popcorn can be considered a healthy, low-fat snack afterward.

In Summary

Whether you microwave your popcorn, pop it on the stove, or in an air popper, it can be a great snack to fill that hungry void. If you want to make healthy popcorn, just take it easy on the salt and butter whether it’s white or yellow.

For taste alone, yellow popcorn is probably the most flavorsome. Yes, the hulls may be bigger but the size difference shouldn’t make much difference.

Just be careful while you chew down on some pieces as certain hulls can be very hard and crack your teeth.

We recommend mixing it up when it comes to popcorn. Don’t settle for white or yellow. Combine the two or even more!

This will give you a wide range of sizes, flavors, and textures to enjoy as you sit down and watch your favorite TV shows and movies.

Andy Waters
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